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New Mexico State University

New Mexico State University

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NMSU’s next climate change lecture to focus on the role of colleges and universities

The impacts of climate change, including drought, rising sea levels and heat waves will weigh most heavily on poor and vulnerable communities, countries and regions, such as the U.S.-Mexico border.


Head and shoulders of man smiling
Jorge Vanegas, dean of the College of Architecture at Texas A&M, will present the third lecture of the New Mexico State University Climate Change Education Seminar Series (NMSUCCESS) of the fall 2019 semester.

New Mexico State University’s Climate Change Education Seminar Series (NMSUCCESS) continues Nov. 6 with a closer look at the role that colleges and universities can play in preparing members of society, especially those in disadvantaged communities, to cope with the evolving challenges posed by climate change.

Jorge Vanagas, dean of the College of Architecture at Texas A&M, will host a presentation titled, “The Human Dimension of Disaster Preparedness, Vulnerability and Resiliency: The Role of Colleges and Universities,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 6 in the Health and Social Services College Annex auditorium, Room 101A.

Vanegas will discuss steps that universities can take, such as interdisciplinary collaboration, to more effectively confront fundamental challenges like disaster preparedness and community resiliency.

“Challenges like global warming and climate change, with the potential serious impacts they pose on people, especially vulnerable and disadvantaged populations, have expanded the significance, criticality and urgency of the role of colleges and universities in developing effective responses through the embedded talent of their students, faculty and staff, through their assets and infrastructure for teaching, research and engagement, and through their capacity for positive transformation and impact,” said Vanegas.

This is the third of the eight NMSUCCESS talks by experts in different fields impacted by climate change over the Fall 2019 and Spring 2020 semesters. Future topics will include geoengineering, mass extinction threats, national and global security concerns and public health impacts. The series’ goal is to shine a light on research and issues related to climate change for this region.