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Artesia Field Day Showcases Economic Impact of Dairies

ARTESIA - Agricultural research on the Pecos Valley's top commodities will highlight an evening field day Tuesday, Aug. 20, at New Mexico State University's Agricultural Science Center at Artesia.



Research aimed at improving forage production and nutrient management will be among scientific projects spotlighted during an Aug. 20 field day at New Mexico State University's Agricultural Science Center at Artesia, says Robert Flynn, a NMSU agronomist. Registration begins at 4 p.m. at the science center, located at 67 E. Four Dinkus Road, six miles south of Artesia. (08/01/2002) (NMSU Agricultural Communications Photo by Norman Martin)

Registration begins at 4 p.m. at the science center, which is located at 67 E. Four Dinkus Road, six miles south of Artesia, and will be followed by a catered barbecue dinner.

The scientific portion of the program begins at 5:30 p.m. with introductions and a short research advisory board business meeting, followed by a presentation on the economic impact of dairies and water related issues in southeastern New Mexico by Jay Lazarus, owner of Glorieta GeoSciences Inc., a environmental consulting firm based in Santa Fe. The field day is free and open to the public.

"Our research deals with issues that are critical for this area, particularly alfalfa, cotton and dairies," said Robert Flynn, science center interim superintendent. The number of dairies in the southeastern New Mexico has jumped significantly in recent years, leading scientists at the center to focus on ways of improving forage production and nutrient management, as well as insect and weed control in field crops.

NMSU researchers from Artesia and other science centers will also give research updates at several field stops, beginning at 6 p.m. Among those presenting information are Leonard Lauriault, forage agronomist from the Agricultural Science Center at Tucumcari, Extension agronomist Denise McWilliams, Extension turfgrass specialist Bernhard Leinauer and senior research specialist Cindy Waddell. Artesia-based researchers will include Flynn, agronomist Martina Murray and entomologist Jane Pierce.

Founded in 1955, the Artesia center has approximately 75 acres under cultivation, using sprinkler, drip and gated pipe irrigation systems. Ongoing research includes fertility studies and manure use in crop production, integrated insect pest management, weed management and performance evaluation of crop varieties and alternative crops.

If you are an individual with a disability who is in need of an auxiliary aid or service to participate, please call Flynn at (505) 748-1228 or your county Extension office in advance.