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NMSU Extension to host bull management workshops in northern New Mexico

In response to northern New Mexico cattle growers need for access to veterinarians and cattle working facilities to perform Trichomoniasis tests, a bull management workshop will be held in three counties.


Close up of dirty white bull’s head
Learn more about Trichomoniasis, a bovine sexually transmitted disease, at a bull management workshop Saturday and Sunday, March 21-22, in Abiquiu. Producers may bring their bulls to be tested for the disease and fertility. The workshop is hosted by New Mexico State University’s Cooperative Extension Service Small Farm and Ranch Task Force and the New Mexico Cattle Growers Association Foundation’s Raising Rancher program. (NMSU photo)

The first will be Saturday and Sunday, March 21-22, in Rio Arriba County at the old feedlot north of Abiquiu, now operated by New Mexico Producers and Marketing Coop.

New Mexico State University’s Cooperative Extension Service conducted a survey of cattle producers in 2018 to identify issues associated with preventing Trichomoniasis, commonly called Trich, in their herds.

Trich is a venereal disease of cattle that is transmitted from the bull to the cow during mating. Bulls do not show any clinical signs of infection but can cause infertility, embryonic death and abortion of calves.

“One issue identified was access to testing facilities and the lack of veterinarians who would go to the remote locations to test the bulls,” said Tom Dominguez, NMSU Extension agricultural agent in Santa Fe County, who coordinated the survey. “In response to this, we are planning bull management workshops at central locations where the producer may bring their bulls to be tested.”

The workshop will include educational presentations about Trich and bull selections. Beef Quality Assurance certified producers will earn continuing education units.

Veterinarians will be on site to preform Trich tests on bulls brought to the event by the producers.

“A full breeding soundness exam of the bulls also will be conducted at the owner’s request,” said Craig Gifford, NMSU Extension beef specialist. “That exam includes a fertility test and physical evaluation of the bull. This is an opportunity for cattle producers to make sure the bull is disease free and fertile.”

Fees for the Trich and fertility tests will be $100 per bull.

Representatives of the New Mexico Livestock Board will be present to answer questions from the cattle producers regarding state regulations.

Bulls of members of cattle associations in the area will be examined on March 21. Bulls of non-association members will be examined on March 22. For more information, contact Donald Martinez, NMSU’s Rio Arriba County Extension agent, at 505-685-4523.

We are partnering with the New Mexico Cattle Growers Association Foundation’s Raising Rancher program to provide this workshop,” Gifford said. “This program has equipment – a portable corral system and squeeze chute – that beginning ranchers in the program may use.”

Raising Rancher program offers educational opportunities for people in ownership or management of a ranch operation for less than 10 years. For more information regarding participation in the Raising Ranchers program, contact Gifford at cgifford@nmsu.edu or 575-646-6482.

Additional bull management workshops are planned for San Miguel and Sandoval counties, dates to be determined. Cattle producers in these counties may contact the NMSU Extension agent in their county for more information.

The bull workshops are hosted by the NMSU Extension’s Small Farm and Ranch Task Force that provides education training in 13 northern New Mexico counties and eight northern pueblos.